Subjective cognitive decline may be early omen of Alzheimer’s

July 19, 2013

Subjective cognitive decline may be early omen of Alzheimer’s

Patients who complain of memory and cognition problems may be experiencing early, subtle signs of Alzheimer’s disease, according to findings from four separate studies presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2013.

A study of 2,319 elderly patients with no dementia at baseline and no mild cognitive impairment (MCI) showed that patients who reported subjective memory impairment (SMI) had a significantly greater decline than control subjects in episodic memory (immediate and delayed recall), and that patients with SMI with self-reported concerns about memory had a greater slope of decline, reported Alexander Koppara, a PhD candidate at the Universitätsklinikum Bonn in Germany.