New imaging test detects prostate cancer much better than any other tests in use today

January 20, 2016

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have found the method they developed to image the prostate appears to be much better at detecting prostate cancer than any other test — radiographical, biopsy or blood — in use today. The findings are published online, ahead of print, in the journal Urology.

In some cases, the imaging test used in the 25-patient study detected even more cancerous lesions than pathologists found when they examined the prostate glands after they had been removed. The study, conducted in men who opted for a radical prostatectomy — total removal of the prostate — agreed to the new imaging test before the operation. Results of the test and the pathological examination were then compared.

The imaging technique uses a novel biomarker that latches on to cancerous cells within the prostate. This agent is given intravenously to patients before a PET (positron emission tomography) scan.

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